33 Books Co. Blog

A 7.09 Year Reunion February 07 2017, 0 Comments

It was super fun to run into Chris at last weekend's Artisinful Chocolate and Beer Festival at Culmination Brewing. As he walked past, he waved his book at me as he passed by my table.*

Seeing the faded ink from across the room (I am a designer with very sensitive eyes, you know), I said, "Wow, that looks like an old one!"

To which Chris replied, "I've had it a long time.**" When he got closer, I asked to examine the book, and when he flipped it, I saw a familiar logo, marking his book as either a first or second edition. Those printings were the only ones which used the BS Brewing*** logo. After that, everything said "33 Books," as that little book slowly became a little business.

Fun memory - and great to meet a longtime fan! Thanks for sharing, Chris!

A photo posted by 33 Books Co. (@33booksco) on

 

* Actually, my electric delivery trike.

** If you're wondering why he hasn't filled it up yet, Chris told me he reserves it for "very special" beers only. He brought it to the fest in case he encountered something really magical, but has set the bar so high he doesn't always record a beer at every fest! 

*** I started 33 Books Co. in November of 2009, as a side-gig to my side-gig: blogging part-time at BSBrewing.com. I was still gainfully employed as Creative Director at a small interactive (websites, apps, etc) ad agency in Portland. Little did I know what kind of an adventure that little book would lead me on!


Holiday Shipping Deadlines (and Buttons!) November 28 2016, 2 Comments

"I Have Great Taste" buttons

I've been busy all year stocking stuff to stuff your stockings. Wait, that doesn't sound right ... What I mean to say is that I'm all geared up and ready to help you fulfill your holiday gift-giving dreams with a stockroom full of great gifts for those with great taste.

From now until I run out, I'll be including a 1-inch round "I have Great Taste" button with every order, my little gift to you.

Speaking of gifts ...

When Should I Order to Receive Stuff for Christmas Morning?

United States

  • Standard Shipping: order by Noon on Friday, December 16th
  • Priority Shipping: order by Noon on Tuesday, December 20th

I'm in Portland, Oregon, so all times are Pacific Standard. Allow an extra two business days for APO/FPO addresses, and US Territories (I'm looking at you, Guam!)

Everywhere Else

I can't guarantee anything once it leaves Portland. Customs processing in the US or in your country can be totally hit-or-miss. Generally, things take 7-10 business days to arrive once they ship, but again, no guarantees. I do promise to ship your items within 1 business day of your order to improve your chances of gift-giving greatness!

  • Standard Shipping: order by Noon on Friday, December 9th

 

 


A Vending Machine for Those with Great Taste November 14 2016, 3 Comments

When I was looking to move 33 Books Co. out of my garage this spring, I looked at a lot of prospective spaces. I knew I wanted something larger than my garage, with ground-floor access, and ... somewhere that I could sell my books directly to consumers: brick-and-mortar. A store. The final frontier.

I had big ideas. Classes! New products! Booze! A cash register! 

And then I remembered an important detail: I don't particularly want to work retail! Set hours, schedules, the public ... no offense, but I like peace and quiet, time to design and print and make, where I can play loud music and listen to podcasts while I work.

Thankfully, I had this realization before signing that lease, and am now located inside a working cidery (Cider Riot!) where I am happily shipping books and maps and coins all over the world, alone and happy.

But, as fate would have it, my friends at said cidery opened a public taproom this summer, which re-opened the possibility of selling directly to you, gentle reader. 

Rather than open a "book window" or standing awkwardly in the corner with a cash box and a box of books, I decided to use the power of techmology, in the form of a circa-1998 vending machine (a restored AP-111, if you're curious).

I am pleased to introduce to you the 33 Books Co. Automated Bookshop and Larder.

A photo posted by Sara Kennedy (@sarakennedy4) on

 

It's stocked with 20 books of my own design, Drinking Coins on demand, and a small selection of my favorite goods from Olympia Provisions, Woodblock Chocolate, Daneson, Smith Tea and Portland Bee Balm should you require logbooks or sustenance while enjoying some of Portland's finest English-style dry cider.

It's open - like the taproom - Wednesday through Sunday. For current hours, check out the Cider Riot! web site.

Come see it (don't forget the folding money*):

33 Books Co. Automated Bookshop and Larder
(inside Cider Riot!)
807 NE Couch St.
Portland, OR 97232

* The machine takes $1 and $5 bills, plus coins.


It's a Small World, After All September 29 2016, 0 Comments

I just returned from the Canadian Coffee and Tea Show in Toronto. Beyond being a great excuse to visit a new city, it was a reminder how simultaneously small and large our world really is.

Next to my booth: a Canadian born in Mexico City who imports coffee from Africa and the Americas. Later, a friend from Africa stopped by to chat about the coming U.S. election.

And me, a boy from Iowa — in Canada for the second time ever — drinking it all in, literally and figuratively.

It was the perfect place to debut my new coffee tasting map.

World Coffee Map

With it, and the help of your local roaster, you can take a journey of your own around the world of coffee, trying (and logging) samples from the 40 countries growing the world’s best Arabica beans. 

It's the product of a lot of design experimentation, and an awful lot of research. I hope you enjoy your own journey. I know I did.


It's a Tough Job, But Somebody Has to Do It! September 19 2016, 0 Comments

I just got back this morning from a quick (23 hours!) trip down to San Francisco, one of my favorite cities on the planet. It's got a killer food and drink culture, and I always try to visit a few new places (recommended: Cellar Maker Brewing) and stay in touch with some of my favorites (Zeitgeist: much more fun with a group). 

I was there judging the Confections category for the Good Food Awards. I have judged before, but this was a new one for me (and pretty delicious, too).

A photo posted by 33 Books Co. (@33booksco) on

 

With beer, wine, cider, and probably every other beverage, there are general style guidelines (e.g. "IPA" or "Chardonnay") you can reference when evaluating a particular sample. The Beer Judge Certification Program (BJCP, for short) publishes very well-defined guidelines for hundreds of beer styles (Foreign Export Stout, India Pale Ale, Barleywine, etc.). When judging beer, you can compare the sample beer to this ideal, and note any deviations, which usually count as penalties. This removes most of the subjectivity from judging.

But it also reduces the impact of how pleasurable a particular product is (in the BJCP judging system, only 10 of 50 possible points are reserved for "overall impression"). 

I found it refreshing, then, when I got to the Good Food Awards tasting, and was told only to evaluate each confection on its sensory merits. How did it look? How did it taste? Did it meet your expectations for flavor as it was described?

I had a great time focusing on the flavors I was experiencing, and not worrying too much about what it was "supposed" to taste/look like. There were some surprises in there - who knew I could actually enjoy a marshmallow - and a whole lot of sugar, too.

Not a bad day at the office.


"Are There Really 33 Kinds of Oyster?" May 28 2015, 0 Comments

33 Oysters on the Half ShellWhen Julie Qiu of the In a Half Shell oyster blog approached me about collaborating on an oyster journal, I wasn't sure. I like oysters quite a bit personally, but are there really enough out there for a whole book? "Definitely," was her answer, and after spending time working with her on this new member of the "33" family, and sampling several dozen oysters, I'm delighted to say I agree with her!

America is home to five distinct species of oysters, and every bay or inlet where they are grown provides another layer of differentiation. Oyster aficionados call this sense of place "merroir," after the French word "terroir," and we can borrow one more wine word while we're at it: appellation, or "place name." There are hundreds, perhaps thousands of US oyster appellations, and 33 Oysters is a way to track your journey as you sample them.

Terroir is a term most commonly applied to wine grapes, and it refers to the unique properties of a wine's home that can show in a wine's flavor and aroma. Soil quality, rainfall, altitude, sunlight and many other geography-related factors can decide why a Chardonnay grown in Champagne tastes this way, and this California version - same grape, remember - tastes completely different.

In the same way, merroir can help explain the differences in flavor between different oysters. A C. gigas (aka "Pacific oyster") grown in Netarts Bay, Oregon tastes completely different from the C. gigas grown farther north in Washington.

Which is all a very long way of saying, "There are a LOT of oysters out there."

Bon voyage!

Recommended reading: A Geography of Oysters, by Rowan Jacobsen


A (Not-so-Brief) History of 33 Books Co., Part 1 November 05 2014, 0 Comments

The story of 33 Books Co. could begin a few places. In 2001, when I moved to Portland, Oregon, and first experienced its amazingly vibrant beer culture. That was also my first visit to the legendary Horse Brass. I opened the beer menu and thought to myself, "40 beers?! There's no way I could ever drink that many!" I had a lot to learn about my new home.


Behind the United States of Beer Map October 07 2013, 2 Comments

When I first designed 33 Bottles of Beer, my goal was to create something small and portable that made taking notes on beers I tried fast and easy.

Four years later, I think I've succeeded, with nearly 100,000 copies printed, a fact I still find incredibly hard to believe. I agonized on printing that initial run, wondering if I'd be giving them away for gifts for decades to come, or using them to steady tipsy tables.

I've filled a good number of the books myself, most while attempting my "beer a day" project back in 2010. And while writing things down has helped me a great deal in remembering details about the beers I've enjoyed (or not), it's always felt a little solipsistic.

So I created this map.

Dave Holding Beer Map

Detail of Surly Over-rated! West Coast IPA from Minnesota

With it, you can try a beer from each state in the US, logging it as you would with the standard 33 Beers book. There's a flavor wheel, and space for recording the beer's name, brewer, date you tried it, and your own rating, from 1 to 5 stars. Here's a great beer from Minnesota, Surly Brewing's Overrated! West Coast IPA.

The poster lets you take your reviews out of your pocket 33 Beers book, and put them on display for all to see. It makes a great visual for your cube, office, home bar, man cave, lady lair, dorm room ... I can't wait to see where they end up.

Post your poster photos on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook using the hashtag #unitedstatesofbeer and let's see who fills one out first, starting ... NOW.


Featured Partner: A Kitchen Box August 22 2013, 1 Comment

One of the best things about my day is finding out all the cool ways "33" books are used. The stories of personal enlightenment, great travel experiences, discoveries make this a really fulfilling job. 

I also get to work with a lot of really interesting partner businesses, one of which is called "A Kitchen Box." You may already be familiar with the box model, but if not, there are a growing number of interesting mail subscription services that provide you a package full of unique and engaging goods on a monthly or quarterly basis (check out the "Must Have Boxes" blog for a nice list/review). Usually there is some theme - in this case, culinary items - but the contents are a surprise until you actually receive the box. It's kind of like a mini-Christmas every month. Here's what it looked like when I opened mine a few weeks ago.

Score! Freddy Guys Hazelnuts are a favorite stop of mine at the Portland Farmers Market, and while they're available in grocery stores here in Oregon, I think it's awesome the rest of the world gets to try them now. They are awesome (pro tip: get the pancake mix should you be lucky enough to visit their farmer's market stall).

33 Pieces of Cheese was featured in AKB's inaugural box, along with a lot of other really fun cheese-themed items, including a neato bamboo cheese spreader, flour sack towel, original letterpressed "fig and onion jam" recipe, porcelain cheese place cards, cheese storage papers ... I'm trying not to ruin the surprise, but there's a lot of fun stuff in there.

Check out A Kitchen Box!


I Fear No Cheese June 24 2013, 0 Comments

The American Cheese Society's annual convention has been described to me as "the GABF of cheese." The mind - and my cholesterol count - boggles.